Mocking up Cybernetic Organs in Rhino.

I’m back to working in Rhino for my Future Generations project, as I aim to create as many different organs as I can for my Cybernetic Organs. I’ve already 3D modelled and printed a pair of lungs and a heart.

As from the body diagrams above, which I used as templates for building my forms, from google search engine, I have been looking at the stomach and liver. I have decided to conjoin these to create one 3D print and model. This was achieved by using the Ellipsoid tool in Solid Creation. I also used the tube tool to develop the tube that connects the liver and stomach together. All of this was achieved with the gumball option turned on, which looks like the 2nd picture in action.


This is my mockups of my stomach and liver in Rhino. At the moment, they have been covered into an STL file and will be sent down to 3D print hopefully later on today. I intend to 3D print the mockups before they are edited on MeshMixer to show the differences between each print. Not only that, but it’s good evidence to see how much editing a 3D model on MeshMixer can change its whole design. This was confusing at first, but once I looked at different diagrams from different views, it made the whole process a lot easier.

Sobo_1909_624.png

For my second organ, I have been looking at the brain. This was more complex as likewise to my Cybernetic Heart, it has quite a few nodes sticking out in certain places. I have a feeling both of these cybernetic organs will be more difficult to Pewter Cast alongside my heart and may have to ask Martin if these will be possible, or if I will need to make quite a few 3-piece moulds in R2D when he has ordered it in. At the moment, my Cybernetic Brain has been put in for 3D printing and will take roughly 2 and half hours to print and is using 24 grams of plastic. My liver and stomach is also going to use the same amount of grams of plastic when it is being 3D printed.

 

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Author: lawrenceaaronmaker

Studying a BA Hons in Artist, Designer; Maker at Cardiff Metropolitan University.

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