BAMS Re-Visited: Contextualisation: Thomas Sabo Charms.

vintage moon and star
“Vintage Moon And Stars” By Thomas Sabo. £119.00. Source: http://www.thomassabo.com

As I am re-visiting my BAMS medal design, I have started to investigate Thomas Sabo for contextualisation. His range of pendants incorporate symbols that are present in everyday life, such as stars, moon and sun. The symbolic nature of these pendants correlate with my new BAMS medal design, as I am incorporating symbolism into my concept.

moon and stars
“Moon And Stars” By Thomas Sabo. £79.00. Source: http://www.thomassabo.com

Although this charm is simpler than that of the “Vintage Moon And Stars” pendant, I still find it elegant and sleek in design. The simplistic nature of the design gives it a warm, glowing aesthetic to the pendant.

star sign coin gold
“Star Sign Coin Gold” By Thomas Sabo. £179.00. Source: http://www.thomassabo.com

This intrinsic design is simply gorgeous, incorporating the twelve star signs in a vintage style. The combination of the glass-ceramic green stone and the yellow-gold tone to the pendant itself creates this aesthetically pleasing charm. I find Thomas Sabo’s pendants to be absolutely stunning, which range from simplistic to more intrinsic.

 

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BAMS Re-Visited: 3D Printed Outcome.

3d print3d print 2
I was excited to reveal my BAMS Re-Visited Medal after it was 3D printed. The detail of the bear came out well, and the text is curious because it did not print to the depths of detail that the CAD model has. Also, the Polaris Star’s raised platforms were lower than expected.

cad 3
I am going to go back into Rhino to experiment with enlarging the text and potentially the constellation. I am also going to go downstairs and talk to Craig Prymble as it could have possibly been a printing error. At this point, it is all trial and error with CAD modelling to develop a new printed outcome.

 

Art & The Conscious Mind: The Presentation.

mona lisa painting

Leonardo da Vinci’s 1503 Mona Lisa.

Leonardo paints his image without outlining the figure, so we are unaware where the figure starts or finishes, it can be seen in certain places that is possible that it merges into the background. Without an outline, the figure does not appear a solid entity. Therefore, are we solid or are our edges blurred?

This correlates to William James’  conscious stream theory, he describes consciousness as a continuous stream, suggesting we experience every conscious state (awake, asleep, catatonic, coma, etc).

As a practising artist, I incorporated the conscious and unconscious theory within my work to make people think.

phebe hemphill coin
Phebe Hemphills 2011 Tuskegee Airmen Medal.

As a practising artist, my work at the moment involves designing medals. To consider how to incorporate the conscious theory into my work made me sit back and think. Looking at this image, the figures, unlike the image of the Mona Lisa, having blurred edges, the three profiles are defined edges in the design of the coin.

I questioned whether or not consciousness existed, or not, when reflecting on Susan Blackmore’s theory of consciousness being an illusion.

The design of my coin was based on this theory, which includes a very simple idea that has ‘conscious’ one side and ‘unconscious’ on the faces of the coin. By flipping the coin, the words on both sides vanish.

coin 4
The theory based on the illusion of the conscious mind.

Art & The Conscious Mind: Overview of the Outcome.

The coin was designed in Rhino CAD modelling software, and was 3D printed. From the 3D print, I created a silicon mould.

The silicon mould allowed me to cast in a variety of materials. The mould was not as good as I had hoped for, because it did not produce very good results with the ‘unconscious’ side when casting in different materiality.

I developed a large quantity of coins casted from pewter. They were first tidied up with the axe saw, then they were filed so their round edges were smooth to touch and polished with sanding paper first. Afterwards, I decided to use my dremmel on the coins to give finishing touches.

Another outcome was wax – this material experimentation gave interesting results, ranging from half casted coins to full casted coins – and with the wax, it even managed to pick up the ‘unconscious’ lettering more than it did in pewter.

Although the outcome is a prototype in Pewter, I plan to take it further outside of my Field deadline. I aim to create a CNC mould, which will provide a cleaner mould for better casting results. I am also curious to try experimenting with other materiality, such as plaster, clay, resin, aluminium and potentially bronze. I also want to create for my end of year exhibition, a stand for the coin which will allow viewers to interact with it. This outcome is still in development, but I have enjoyed my time in this Field module and applying the theory of consciousness to my artist practice.

An Evaluation of Field: Year 2 Module.

Evaluation of Field:

Year 2’s Field module incorporated two five-week project briefs, to include:

Term 1: Disobedient Objects:

Skills/Context/Ideas

  • Explore and evidence experimentation of skill-sets beyond their subject specific domain
  • Demonstrate and evaluate their individual study and research direction within their reflective writing
  • Evaluate the impact that independent research has on their learning and how this has generated contextual ideas.
  • Consolidate the appropriate professional skills, responsibilities and practices related to their own discipline
  • Demonstrate the links between the formation of ideas and their realisation in a body of work

To incorporate the skills, context and ideas as required by this module, I decided to investigate materials related to light objects and narratives. Obviously, I had to achieve to create an object that was disobedient in its outcome in some way. After my research into lighting, Vikings, food art, and BSI (British Safety Institution), because I wanted to include a material in my design that was unsafe by BSI standards, as it could be a possible fire hazard. And also, visually, the material I decided to incorporate within my design, would totally collapse within time and is therefore completely unsuitable for a child’s night-light design.

I decided to create a Viking night-light for a child’s bedroom. The ship’s design referred to the myth of sailing into one’s dreams. The sail, which was the focus of the light effect, was created from jelly based confectionery. This was melted down and sculpted into a single mast, to create the sail. This obviously in time, was part of the disobedient object that was to degrade down to a gooey mass and totally unsuitable as a BSI approved night-light. Within this model, I was given instructions on how to connect neopixels to adapt into my design. But I was unable to finish the programming of the neopixels with the arduino, because I had connectivity issues when soldering.

To give an overview on the outcome of this module, it has taught me to manage my time better to give extra consideration of time for a process that could possibly fail or is time consuming. Overall, I am not going on this direction within my own art practice, but I have transferred skill-sets such as Illustrator and laser cutter, from this module into my subject module.

Term 1: Art & The Conscious Mind:

Skills/Context/Ideas

  • Explore and evidence experimentation of skill-sets beyond their subject specific domain
  • Demonstrate and evaluate their individual study and research direction within their reflective writing
  • Evaluate the impact that independent research has on their learning and how this has generated contextual ideas.
  • Consolidate the appropriate professional skills, responsibilities and practices related to their own discipline
  • Demonstrate the links between the formation of ideas and their realisation in a body of work

Before this Field module, I really did not give much thought into the subject matter of the conscious mind. In my ‘awake’ time, I accepted that I was conscious, and during my ‘sleep’ time, I accepted I was unconscious. I had a very basic understanding of this field, and I did not find it necessary to challenge the actual concept of the conscious mind. Now during this module, I have come to consider the theories that were delivered in each session, and I have not yet reached a final conclusion on whether I believe the conscious mind exists or does not exist.

I feel this module has given me a new perspective to consider when I am creating my own artefacts. I would not have conceived to be theoretical about my own practice before this module, but hopefully I will continue to read further on this subject as I did find it of great interest to actually look at myself on a more holistic level. As the conscious mind is not matter and the best way to give it consideration would be through meditative purposes, the whole idea of experiencing meditation class on a very simple level was possibly an interesting pathway into the subject. Although I have meditated on a minor level in my own time, I did not consider this a pathway to the conscious mind. So therefore, it was the whole interconnection of the information and the practice that knitted the subject together. This module was very thought-provoking, at times very heavy, as obviously the theorists proved that I had to have a great interest in the subject matter to continue to learn about the subject matter.

Art & The Conscious Mind: Visual Stimuli Workshop by Craig Thomas.

As Field is coming to a close (with the deadline next Tuesday), it was the last workshop of the module today. I was looking forward to this particular workshop, because Craig Thomas was running it and it sounded interesting. It was held in the AV studio – the point of the exercise was to expose us to visual stimuli, which Craig Thomas had made specifically for this ‘experiment’ within the workshop. Unfortunately, I was unable to participate for very long, due to visual and sensory problems. I found the visual stimuli overwhelming; it made me feel uneasy, sick, dizzy, and when people were walking through the piece of work, that is when I had to redraw myself from the activity. Everyone’s body shapes warped and distorted, and it felt like I could not breathe.